Apocalypse World

Não é só o D&D que merece respeito! Existem muitos outros sistemas bons, vários deles gratuitos. Aqui você pode conhecê-los!

Moderador: Moderadores

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Apocalypse World

Mensagem#1 » 27 Dez 2010, 02:42

Cara, eu não entendo como esses designers de indie-games conseguem ter idéias awesome de uma forma que os desenvolvedores tradicionais com seus high-fantasy o-bem-vence-o-mal-e-espanta-o-temporal ultra-batidos sequer chegam perto.

(e também não entendo como continuo comprando essas porras indie mesmo sabendo que a probabilidade de eu vir a jogá-los é menor do que ganhar na mega-sena)

Mas aí está. Outro jogo com premissa fuderosamente psicodélica que vai levar uma grana do meu bolso, nem que seja pelo pdf somente.

E dessa vez eu não vou fazer review próprio, porque to cansado pra cacete. Então perdoem o texto em inglês. Apenas lembre de dar uma olhada nisso aqui (clique "salvar como") quando o texto mencionar os tipos de personagens.

[imagemlarga]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_z6q1zrAK7QE/TJ3wPhd1nZI/AAAAAAAAAGI/y7Pvdh2l5Qk/s1600/Apocalypse+World+cover.jpg[/imagemlarga]

Review:
SPOILER: EXIBIR
The first new RPG I bought at Gen Con 2010 is Apocalypse World by Dogs of the Vineyard designer Vincent Baker. I met him early during the con and he made a great pitch while I was looking for a post-apocalyptic game for my gaming group. Our mutual interests collided and I left with a beautiful, autographed, pocket-sized paperback.

I’d likely play it next week with my gaming group so here’s a chatty style review.

Capsule Review

Not for the faint of heart from both a thematic and playing philosophy point of view, Apocalypse World presents a very clever and apparently engrossing game. It’s main focus is not so much on player accomplishment or setting exploration(although the PCs are complete badasses) but rather the relationships that form between PCs and the constantly mutating loyalties and rivalries between them.

If you’ve started enjoying story games that thrive on failures like Mouse Guard and Burning Wheel but want to explore a darker, very adult theme, Apocalypse World is well worth giving a try.

Buying the book+PDF: Click Here

The Core Play Philosophy

As can be expected from a Lumpley Games RPG, Apocalypse World is first and foremost a Story Game focusing not on collecting whacked out technological gear while fighting mutants. Rather it’s very much about the loyalties and rivalries that form when exceptional, kickass beings (the PCs) band together against a merciless, you’ll-get-screwed-no-matter-what world of decay, scarcity and multiple threats coming from everywhere.

Play focuses on players getting into trouble and how they resolve it (usually by getting into more trouble, leaving behind numerous dead NPCs). The PCs follow their own agendas for survival: performing tasks, raiding groups of NPCs (or even those of other PCs) to gain resources and acting on obligations that often crop up.

Play also follows meta-plots, called Fronts, where events and/or major NPC groups move in the already busy schedules of the PCs to make things more interesting and prevent players from establishing too much stability in the world.

For example, a new cult can move in near the PCs holding, bearing a strange viral plague that reprograms people into new fanatical converts before they die horribly of some form of brain cancer 3 months later.

Finally, the game forcefully tells GMs (called Master of Ceremonies or MCs) to refrain from prepping stories and adventures. Prep focuses on keeping NPCs and organizations created through play straight (there are plenty of tools available online for that) and organizing the game’s fronts.

The Implied Setting and World building

The game’s implied setting starts unspecified yet remains very specialized:

Here be the post-apocalypse and some serious, undefined shit is brewing in some ethereal entity called the psychic maelstrom.

The world takes shape as the players flesh out their characters while the MC innocently peppers the discussion with questions about the PCs pasts, current location, make of vehicles and names of every NPC around them.

The answers of such questions, with healthy doses of “Just make it up” whenever players falter, create the world as the MC notes relevant details on the very elegantly designed 1st session worksheet.

Character Generation

Characters are presented to players as playbooks: a combination character generation rules, character sheet and character specific rules. Each playbook represent an established Post-Apocalyptic badass archetype and two players can’t play the same since each represent a unique exceptional individual.

Some examples:

* The Angel heals people, and has a medical clinic with staff.
* The Battlebabe kills and intimidates everyone with her custom whacked up weapons.
* The Gunlugger is the ultimate killer badass with more guns than shorts.
* The Hocus is a religious leader prophet controlling a cult of NPCs (think Season 4 Gaius Baltar).
* The Brainer screws with people’s brains with her psychic abilities.
* The Hardholder is the leader of an established community of variable size .

And so on.

The playbook outlines all the choices that players make to create the PC, from names, look, equipment, and stat range so it is a clever, self-contained document.

Oh yeah, and thanks to Ron Edwards’ influence (among many other Indie luminaries), the PCs have special powers when they have sex with one another. [Ok, isso é algo completamente escroto, que eu não usaria no meu jogo nunca]

Yeah, that kind of game.

The Game Mechanics

Mechanically speaking, the game is an exchange of narrative “moves” where a move describes an action/event/game element with a significant impact in the game’s fiction.

All characters have basic moves like “Going aggro” and “Read a Situation” and character specific ones like the Angel’s “Healing Touch”. Establishing success of such moves (when significant) requires a player to roll 2d6 and add a relevant stat (which usually goes from -2 to +4). A 7-9 is a soft success (i.e. it works but something goes wrong/different than planned as described by each moves) and a 10+ is a hard success.

While the player will use the terminology of their moves (basic and character-specific) to clearly indicate to the MC what they are attempting, the MC will ask the player to fictionalize said move to make it cooler by saying, over and over again: “Cool, how do you do that?”

The Master of Ceremonies

The MC is guided by a set of formal narrative principles like “Barf forth Apocalyptica” and “always respect the logic of the game”. He also has very specific moves like”Announce Future Badness”, “Separate them” and “‘take their stuff away”. In essence, the MC announces that something happens whenever he makes a move and asks players to react with moves of their own. For example:”A bad guy slinks away behind you and loops a steel wire around your neck, what do you do?”

Most everything the MC does in the game is make moves that lead up to the “what do you do” question, the MC almost never rolls dice. PCs get hurt (Shot at, drugged, strangled, etc) when they fail rolls. It’s the move players choose reactively that either gets them out of trouble, lands them into different trouble or leaves them lying in a puddle of blood.

The MC must also makes crap up on the spot (NPC moods, appearances, actions) while narrating. When well done, players don’t notice anything other than an apocalyptic tinged fully interactive story that remains internally consistent with both the rules and the apparent onscreen/offscreen logic…

Things become really interesting when PCs either miss a roll or give the MC a golden opportunity to screw with them… thus the MC is invited to go to town and make the most heinous-yet-interesting-for-the-PCs move he can think about. A bit like Mouse Guard’s failure mechanic… only not G-rated and guided by the MC’s list of moves (and any custom ones that fit the game).

The MC also names everything so that all NPCs gain a semblance of substance… but never so much that he gets to hesitate to get them killed, maimed, destroyed at the players whim.

The game’s fuel is the MC’s questions to the characters (not players). Those questions (and answers) build the world and shape where the action goes. Many (if not most) of these questions should be embedded in the MC’s moves or in response to players Moves/questions (i.e. turning player questions back to the group).

Chatty: You’re reading this awesome review, What does it remind you of? What does it make you feel like?

Exactly like that.

So Chatty what are your thoughts?

After reading the book and going over the game’s forums, I definitively want to try it for a few sessions. This is NOT Fallout the RPG. There is very limited space for armour, explosives and advanced weaponry. What it is about is scarce water, savage gangs of bikers/cultists, warlord raiders, driving through the desert in search of medicines and trying to decipher what the hell is the Psychic Maelstorm before it rots everyone’s brains.

Oh and see if you can get in Marie’s pants before she makes a move on Roark.

I’m completely intrigued by a game with no formal planning and especially by the “you don’t roll stuff, the players do”. It makes me feel the game is hard to master for both players and the MC. There are a LOT of little bits here in there that can be easily forgotten.

I’ll spend the week thinking of some visuals and sub-themes so I can barf forth the appropriate levels of Apocalyptica.
Última edição por Armitage em 27 Dez 2010, 15:00, editado 3 vezes no total.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#2 » 27 Dez 2010, 14:52

Concordo contigo, Oda.

Vendo de novo, acho que o reviewer não foi feliz (e eu também não, ao escolher seu review pra botar qui). O cara ficou olhando para (e louvando) as pequenas partes sem conseguiu ver o "todo" - que, me parece, consiste numa premissa bem simples de jogo. Eu diria até "old school" (se é que entendo bem o que esse termo significa): um cenário minimamente esboçado ("você estão num mundo pós-apocalíptico. Pronto") , classes/arquétipos/nichos de personagens bem definidas, e GM mais preocupado em zelar pela causalidade das ações dos jogadores de forma fria e crua ("aaah morreu é? problema seu, ninguem mandou meter a cara onde não devia") do que um papai goddie-goodie contando uma estória bonitinha.

Acho que a diferença é a forma como o jogo faz esse "old school", ao usar uma roupagem indie: pouca/nenhuma preparação de aventura por parte do GM (aventuras são criadas e desenroladas pela criatividade de decisões dos próprios jogadores, ao invés do railroading pré-fabricado do GM); provocação intensa de escolhas e dilemas para os personagens a todo o momento, e nas consequencias dessas escolhas (mesmo que sejam ruins os personagens), etc. E talvez aí o jogo comece se distanciar de, say, OD&D ou Gamma World, porque enquanto estes não se preocupam com esses tipos de dilemas, escolhas, consequencias, etc. esse Apocalypse World parece ter isso como uma peça central. Em outras palavras: se em Gamma World o grupo tem que destruir a gangue de motoqueiros-canibais malévolos que assolam os arredores criada pelo GM , em Apocalypse World essa gangue provavelmente foi idéia de um jogador e ela teria um lado "bondoso" (ou ao menos ambíguo), que faria com que a opção de trucidá-la fosse no mínimo de dificil escolha (e as consequencias seriam ruins, independente da alternativa seguida).

O que achei muito interessante são as ferramentas que o jogo possui, como essa aqui (repare na lista de nomes ao lado - que GM nunca se viu precisando inventar nome on-the-fly ? ), além das já linkadas classes de personagens.

Editado: Cara, to lendo as classes de personagens nesse link aí em cima. MUITO HILÁRIO! Cada classe tem uma introdução bacana, nomes disponiveis, gêneros sexuais mais comuns (tem uns que tem "ambiguous" :mrgreen: ), "poderes", etc. Maneiríssimo.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
shido_vicious
Mensagens: 39

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#3 » 27 Dez 2010, 17:11

O Apocalypse World tem o melhor sistema de classes que eu já vi. Quanto mais restritivo, melhor o sistema de classes -- visto que a utilidade desse mecanismo está em facilitar o máximo as escolhas, restringindo opções até que as únicas possíveis sejam todas eficazes e apropriadas ao que se deseja da classe (no caso do AW, representar um conceito específico).

Os playbooks são fenomenais -- eles não só contêm todas as opções possíveis como também as próprias regras de criação do personagem. E isto inclui os relacionamentos entre o grupo (a parada do Hx). Basta seguir os passos do playbook e temos a elaboração não só do personagem, mas da dinâmica do grupo.

Silva, eu não acho o sistema de efeitos por fazer sexo escroto -- é um momento importante de vulnerabilidade e abertura (no pun intended) emocional em que o relacionamento entre personagens pode dar uma guinada brusca. É nesta esfera que o AW se diferencia dos Gamma Worlds porradeiros da vida -- enquanto no AW de fato se combate monstruosidades (humanas ou inumanas) e se junta tranqueiras (seja na forma de Barter ultra-abstraído, ou pertences vindos da classe, como os veículos do Driver e a estrutura comunal do Hardholder), o central é o relacionamento entre os personagens -- o que por si já serve como fonte de conflito, algo um tanto comum (e criticado) em jogos indies. (Sem falar que a fonte de experiência está no progresso desses relacionamentos -- quando o Hx chega a +4, marca-se experiência e reduz-se o Hx para +1.)

Se o grupo de jogo é daqueles que acham "masculinamente inapropriado" sequer mencionar sexo em um grupo exclusivamente de outros homens (exceto para se gabar de "façanhas" cujo relato é totalmente retocado) -- ou um no qual "sexo" é sempre seguido de LOLZ! -- talvez o Apocalypse World não seja o melhor jogo. Talvez este seja um grupo mais adequado ao Gamma World.

Com algumas modificações, daria para usar esse jogo para algo na linha do seriado Walking Dead -- embora "matança" de zumbis e colecionismo frenético de tranqueira sejam fortes (parece ser o padrão de todo mundo hecatombeado), o que me pareceu ser a real forte de tensão é a dinâmica social dos sobreviventes no momento em que eles se juntam em grupos. Que evidentemente será qualquer coisa exceto touchy-feely -- uma característica das "pequenas democracias" é a coerção pela força e qualquer outro método que se puder usar para ficar no topo da pirâmide. É o tipo de preocupação que existe no design do AW, mas não no do GW.

Dá quase no mesmo que dizer que o RPG do Smallville "deveria" ter sido feito para M&M -- quem diz isso ignora a enorme diferença de foco existente entre o M&M e a versão do Cortex usada no Smallville.
Tapista: feels like home... Stockholm!

Meu Deviantart

Avatar do usuário
shido_vicious
Mensagens: 39

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#4 » 27 Dez 2010, 19:03

GoldGreatWyrm escreveu:
Silva escreveu:
Editado: (...) gêneros sexuais mais comuns (tem uns que tem "ambiguous" :mrgreen: ), "poderes", etc. (...)


OMG :rolando:


Obrigado pelo exemplo prático. Tem jogado Gamma World?

GoldGreatWyrm escreveu:Peraí, o foco do jogo é transar?


Não foi o que eu escrevi. Tenta ler novamente.
Tapista: feels like home... Stockholm!

Meu Deviantart

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#5 » 28 Dez 2010, 00:31

Oda, eu também estranhei a idéia a princípio, porém lendo mais a respeito acho que combina com a proposta gritty de AW (o sexo, ou qualquer outra relação prazerosa entre os personagens, seria uma espécie de válvula de escape pra contrastar com o mundo miserável ao redor). Mas não sabia que existe toda uma mecânica pra esse elemento. Isso procede mesmo?

shido_vicious escreveu:O Apocalypse World tem o melhor sistema de classes que eu já vi. Quanto mais restritivo, melhor o sistema de classes -- visto que a utilidade desse mecanismo está em facilitar o máximo as escolhas, restringindo opções até que as únicas possíveis sejam todas eficazes e apropriadas ao que se deseja da classe (no caso do AW, representar um conceito específico).

Os playbooks são fenomenais -- eles não só contêm todas as opções possíveis como também as próprias regras de criação do personagem. E isto inclui os relacionamentos entre o grupo (a parada do Hx). Basta seguir os passos do playbook e temos a elaboração não só do personagem, mas da dinâmica do grupo.

O sistema de classes dele não só parece funcionalmente excelente, como é muito estiloso ( :shades: ). Quanto aos "Hx", eles funcionariam mais ou menos como os "trust points" de Mountain Witch/Cold City/Hot War ? Ou seja, como um pool de pts que quantifica a relação de confiança entre os personagens, e pode ser gasto para auxiliar uns aos outros ?

Silva, eu não acho o sistema de efeitos por fazer sexo escroto -- é um momento importante de vulnerabilidade e abertura (no pun intended) emocional em que o relacionamento entre personagens pode dar uma guinada brusca. É nesta esfera que o AW se diferencia dos Gamma Worlds porradeiros da vida -- enquanto no AW de fato se combate monstruosidades (humanas ou inumanas) e se junta tranqueiras (seja na forma de Barter ultra-abstraído, ou pertences vindos da classe, como os veículos do Driver e a estrutura comunal do Hardholder), o central é o relacionamento entre os personagens -- o que por si já serve como fonte de conflito, algo um tanto comum (e criticado) em jogos indies. (Sem falar que a fonte de experiência está no progresso desses relacionamentos -- quando o Hx chega a +4, marca-se experiência e reduz-se o Hx para +1.)

Se o grupo de jogo é daqueles que acham "masculinamente inapropriado" sequer mencionar sexo em um grupo exclusivamente de outros homens (exceto para se gabar de "façanhas" cujo relato é totalmente retocado) -- ou um no qual "sexo" é sempre seguido de LOLZ! -- talvez o Apocalypse World não seja o melhor jogo. Talvez este seja um grupo mais adequado ao Gamma World.

Sim, como disse antes para o Oda, depois de ler mais concordo com esse tipo de elemento na proposta do AW (válvula de escape, pra contrastar com o mundo miserável ao redor). O problema é que a coisa é um tanto inusitada, e o autor, ao que parece, não teve nenhum pudor na forma que a colocou lá, então já prevejo olhos arregalados e piadinhas sarcásticas da maioria dos jogadores.

...o que me pareceu ser a real forte de tensão é a dinâmica social dos sobreviventes no momento em que eles se juntam em grupos. Que evidentemente será qualquer coisa exceto touchy-feely -- uma característica das "pequenas democracias" é a coerção pela força e qualquer outro método que se puder usar para ficar no topo da pirâmide. É o tipo de preocupação que existe no design do AW, mas não no do GW.

This. Lendo mais sobre ele, isso ficou evidente pra mim também.

Você chegou a comprar o jogo? To pensando em me dar esse presente de natal.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#6 » 28 Dez 2010, 01:00

Sim, concordo. Aliás, é o mesmo problema do Dogs in the Vineyard - achar um grupo disposto a sair da zona de conforto dos jogos tradicionais e jogar algo, digamos, um pouco mais "pesado".

No mais, já prevejo adaptações pra D&D desse jogo. Os playbooks pra classes clássicas de D&D ficariam irados. Just imagine. :bwaha:
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#7 » 28 Dez 2010, 01:54

Não sabia que o Kill puppies era dele. Prolifico esse Vincent Baker.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#8 » 28 Dez 2010, 12:18

O cara pega o bonde andando e não entende porra nenhuma do que postei, porque leu meu texto com o "copo cheio" de uma merda de uma guerrinha Trad vs Indie.

Entenda uma coisa, meu caro: não existe "meu RPG é melhor que o seu", nem "estilos superiores" ou algo parecido. Existem jogos diferentes para gostos diferentes. Tacticians munchkins radicais são tão alienados quanto emos "true-roleplayers" radicais. "Interpretação" pra mim é a atividade de sentar com a galera e engajar na atividade que chamamos "RPG". Não importa se você está apenas tomando decisões táticas num combate, ou recitando Shakespeare, ou acariciando seu ego, ou apenas zoando com a galera - se você está sentado e o jogo começou, está acontecendo "interpretação".

Antes de sair por aí falando merda, tente entender pelo menos o que está sendo discutido.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#9 » 28 Dez 2010, 12:26

O juízo de valor está lá, e eu o suporto com todas as minhas palavras. Acredito piamente que o "mainstream" tem muito menos idéias inovadoras e mais clichês, tanto a nivel de sistema como de cenários, do que o "underground" indie. E isso não quer dizer que eu me sinta superior a outros jogadores só por causa disso. E se não concorda, perfeito. Em nenhum momento falei aquilo como uma "verdade absoluta" ou axioma universal. É apenas minha percepção particular dos fatos.


Editado: dava um bom trono pra um gunluggger...

The Throne of Weapons

[imagemlarga]http://static.neatorama.com/misscellania/490throne1.jpg[/imagemlarga]
Última edição por Armitage em 28 Dez 2010, 22:23, editado 1 vez no total.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#10 » 28 Dez 2010, 22:51

Adept, Mutants & Masterminds é inovador com relação a D&D, mas nada ali é novidade em relação ao restante da indústria.

Sobre mais inovação e menos clichês, concordo apenas na parte de sistemas, já que não conheço nenhum RPG "mainstream" com um sistema de resolução de cenas ao invés de ações. sobre cenários... Veja, o tema "mundo pós apocalíptico" já é um cliche por si só. por outro lado, Vampiro a Máscara foi inovador na sua época - e não era indie.

Então Freesample, não estou dizendo que todo jogo indie é inovador e todo jogo mainstream é clichê. Esse Apocalypse World mesmo não tem nada de inovador em termos de cenário (como o Oda já tinha falado). E concordo que Vampire foi uma puta inovação, tanto em cenário quanto em sistema.

MAS tenho a impressão que se fizéssemos um levantamento de todos os cenários mainstream e indie publicados, veriamos que a maioria dos maintream consistem em variações conservadoras de 1 ou 2 gêneros estabelecidos (high fantasy tolkienesco sendo o principal), enquanto os jogos indie, apeasar de também possuirem seus high fantasy, possuem mais gêneros obscuros e excêntricos, e até mesmo coisas dificeis de serem classificadas (qual o gênero de Dogs in the Vineyard, My Life with Master, e Lacuna por exemplo? :sobrancelha: ).
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Advogado de Regras
Mensagens: 2235

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#11 » 29 Dez 2010, 06:20

MAS tenho a impressão que se fizéssemos um levantamento de todos os cenários mainstream e indie publicados, veriamos que a maioria dos maintream consistem em variações conservadoras de 1 ou 2 gêneros estabelecidos (high fantasy tolkienesco sendo o principal), enquanto os jogos indie, apeasar de também possuirem seus high fantasy, possuem mais gêneros obscuros e excêntricos, e até mesmo coisas dificeis de serem classificadas (qual o gênero de Dogs in the Vineyard, My Life with Master, e Lacuna por exemplo? ).


Variação conservadora? :sobrancelha:

Pense nos cenários da TSR, a começar com Spelljammer (Damn, o cenário coloca a Física Aristotélica como base da realidade),Planescape e Dark Sun - todos os 3 podem ser chamados de "High Fantasy", mas distorcem brutalmente quase todos os tropes aplicados a ela e misturam com algum outro gênero (Pós-Apoc para Dark Sun e Space Opera com Spelljammer). Sem contar que a Wizards of the Coast lançou Everway, a maior tentativa de lançar um "Indie RPG" no mercado "Mainstream" seguindo todos os conselhos "trendy" no ramo nos anos 90 (que o planes chamava, corretamente, do "Woodstock do RPG").

Saindo do território da Wizards/TSR, dá para citar no caso da WhiteWolf ao menos Mago: Ascensão (e o seu spin-off, Cruzada dos Feiticeiros), Vampiro: A Máscara e Wraith: The Oblivion. Não é sequer necessário citar Vampiro (well, eu não acho ele nenhum pouco inovador, mas aqui é meu gut-feeling falando muito mais alto), mas Mago era consideravelmenta criativo tematicamente (Conflito de Visões do Mundo, Magia como "Expressão da Vontade", a própria idéia do Paradoxo) e Wraith vinha com a "Shadow", a versão "sombria` do seu personagem - que era controlada por outro jogador. Além de ser um dos cenários mais deprimentes que eu já li.

E lembre-se, esses RPGs suportam uma variação temática muito maior do que qualquer "Indie RPG", já que não são feitos com a idéia "forgística" de que um bom jogo deve ser limitado tematicamente e tentar agradar uma (e só uma) forma de jogar. Aliás, talvez seja esse o motivo de tais RPGs serem "excêntricos" ou "criativos": eles tem que ser de escopo restrito e fazerem de tudo para reforçar tal escopo.
"Powergaming: Por que você não pode interpretar se está morto" por Morrowner Fórum da WotC.

"The fear of munchkins, I have found, is a much greater threat to game integrity than actual munchkins." por Black Hat Matt, freelancer da White Wolf.

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#12 » 30 Dez 2010, 11:55

Ok Elven, concordo com tudo que você disse. Mas será que esses tipos aí que você citou compõem uma porcentagem grande do "todo" mainstream para serem chamados de "a norma", ao invés de exceção?

EDIT: achei uma lista geral de rpgs aqui e outra só de indies aqui. Talvez ajude com alguma coisa.
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Avatar do usuário
Armitage
Mensagens: 1056

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#13 » 30 Dez 2010, 12:42

Acho que "mainstream" seriam IPs comissionados ou dirigidos por empresas, ao invés de criados, dirigidos e mantidos por seus autores originais. Em outras palavras, D&D era "indie" até sair da direção e criação de seus autores originais (Gygax e Arneson), e passou a ser "mainstream" quando suas rédeas e meios de publicação passaram a ser controladas por comitês empresariais. Outro exemplo: Terras Sagradas será "indie" até os autores venderem seus direitos pra Wizards of the Coast, Steve Jackson Games, etc. e daí em diante todas as decisões de design, desenvolvimento e publicação passarem a ser ditadas por comitês corporativos.

Resumindo: enquanto uma obra se mantiver nas mãos de seus autores originais (tanto a nivel criativo como de publicação), ela é indie. Pelo menos eu acho que é isso. XD
A "boa arte" nada mais é do que a "modinha da vez", ditada pelos atuais diretores do clube da luluzinha da vez. Troca-se os diretores (ou o clube da luluzinha), e troca-se a definição de "boa arte".

Russel
Mensagens: 319

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#14 » 12 Abr 2011, 14:46

Armitage escreveu:Acho que "mainstream" seriam IPs comissionados ou dirigidos por empresas, ao invés de criados, dirigidos e mantidos por seus autores originais. Em outras palavras, D&D era "indie" até sair da direção e criação de seus autores originais (Gygax e Arneson), e passou a ser "mainstream" quando suas rédeas e meios de publicação passaram a ser controladas por comitês empresariais. Outro exemplo: Terras Sagradas será "indie" até os autores venderem seus direitos pra Wizards of the Coast, Steve Jackson Games, etc. e daí em diante todas as decisões de design, desenvolvimento e publicação passarem a ser ditadas por comitês corporativos.

Resumindo: enquanto uma obra se mantiver nas mãos de seus autores originais (tanto a nivel criativo como de publicação), ela é indie. Pelo menos eu acho que é isso. XD


na verdade não. quando algo se torna muito popular ele passa a ser mainstrean mesmo que ainda esteja nas mãos de seus criadores originas

Avatar do usuário
Lumine Miyavi
Mensagens: 6366
Contato:

Re: Apocalypse World

Mensagem#15 » 12 Abr 2011, 15:22

Silva defende Shadowrun como SISTEMA. Cadê seu Deus agora?

Voltar para “Outros Sistemas”

Quem está online

Usuários neste fórum: Nenhum usuário registrado e 2 visitantes